As two great activities for fitness and weight loss, swimming and running both come with their different advantages. If you are looking to keep active and stay fit then both of these sports will do the trick. They are both extremely popular and equally right for you, depending on what you are looking for. You should remember to choose the one that you enjoy most and that you feel will help you achieve your goals.

When trying to decide between swimming vs running, it is important to understand the difference between the two and also the swimming benefits and swimming tips, as well as running tips, to make sure you get the most out of each sport. Reading through our information on running for beginners and swimming for beginners should provide you with a better idea on the two fitness activities.

How is swimming good for you?

As a water-based form of exercise, swimming reduces the stress on your joints due to the way water makes your body lighter. The resistance of the water also is greater than that of air, so when practising different types of strokes you are working more on toning your muscles than it might seem. Despite burning less calories, swimming will still burn a significant amount that would be more than walking or weight-lifting. Both these exercises will focus on working your spine, however, swimming allows you to train your body as a whole as the kicking actions of your legs and pulling actions of your arms work together efficiently.

How is running good for you?

As a land-based exercise, running can be a high-impact workout that stimulates bone growth and increases your heart rate but you are more vulnerable to running injuries due to the stress on your joints. Compared to swimming, an hour session of running will burn considerable more calories at a high-intensity speed, but a light jog for the same duration will burn approximately the same amount as a swimming session. Similar to swimming, your spine will be the main point of muscle action, followed by your legs which will receive specific attention. During running, your upper body contributes to the work but doesn’t receive the benefits as it would in swimming.